Archive for the ‘Series’ Category

WoT02 The Great Hunt


Series: The Wheel of Time, Book 2
Pages: 705 (Mass Market Paperback)
Publisher: Tor Fantasy
Date: October 15, 1991

Reading the second book of a fourteen book (fifteen, if you count the prequel) series feels somewhat like still being in the beginning, despite having now read well over a thousand pages set in Jordan’s world. In this, my third review in my reread of Robert Jordan’s epic The Wheel of Time series, I find myself thoroughly enjoying the way so far, and ready to go ever onward. Click through to read my take on The Great Hunt.

 

 

My reviews of other books in The Wheel of Time series:

Prequel: New Spring, reviewed May 28, 2014
Book One: The Eye of the World, reviewed May 29, 2014

<<Spoiler Alert: While it feels a bit odd giving a spoiler alert for a book that is over twenty years old, there are always new readers discovering Jordan and his epic series. This review contains plot and character details from this book, as well as from previous books in the series. If you wish to remain spoiler-free, do not click through.>>
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WoT01_TheEyeOfTheWorld


Series: The Wheel of Time, Book 1
Pages: 832 (Mass Market Paperback)
Publisher: Tor Fantasy
Date: November 15, 1990

I originally read Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time series beginning in 2002 when I was living in Japan. My friend Mike introduced me to Mr. Jordan’s fantastical world, and I was hooked from the very beginning. At that time, there were nine books out in the series, Jordan having released them at a pace of almost one a year (take that, George RR Martin!). A tenth came out in 2003, and eleventh in 2005. Then, nothing. Jordan got sick, and passed in September of 2007, leaving his series unfinished, and his fans both saddened and disappointed. That was not, however, the end of The Wheel of Time.

My reviews of other books in The Wheel of Time series:

Prequel: New Spring, reviewed May 28, 2014
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WoT00_NewSpring


Series: The Wheel of Time, Book 0
Pages: 400 (Mass Market Paperback)
Publisher: Tor Fantasy
Date: January, 2004

New Spring was originally published as part of an anthology in 1999: Legends: Short Novels by the Masters of Modern Fantasy, edited by Robert Silverberg. I came across this volume in a library years ago, but never got around to reading it. A few years after the original version, Robert Jordan decided to flesh out the novella into a full novel as the first of an intended prequel trilogy, and it was republished on its own. This is the version that I’ll be reviewing here. I had the book for several years before starting it; however, recently, I’ve decided to give the entire Wheel of Time series a reread, now that Brandon Sanderson has completed his “collaboration” with the original author, Robert Jordan, who passed away seven years ago leaving the series unfinished. Sanderson has, by all accounts, done a yeoman’s job, in the process writing three new volumes to finish the series. Over the next year or so, I’ll be revisiting the series (and reading four of the volumes for the first time), beginning with this, the only prequel Jordan completed before his untimely death. Click through after the break for my review.

My other reviews in The Wheel of Time series:

Book One: The Eye of the World, reviewed May 29, 2014

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his-majestys-dragon

I first heard about Naomi Novik’s Temeraire series when reading through the list of upcoming books and authors to watch in Locus magazine. (By the way, if you are at all interested in trying your hand at SF or Fantasy, Locus is a must-read for you; you can subscribe online at their website here.) It’s premise of a Napoleonic period with dragons immediately captured my attention. The addition of naval elements cemented the deal, and I went down to my local bookstore to buy the first book in the series, His Majesty’s Dragon. What a great debut novel this is.

(Note: The original title of this novel was Temeraire, which remains the title in the UK and some other territories. The American publishers decided to go with His Majesty’s Dragon both to address the British focus of the novel (it’s always good to mention royalty), and to be a little less obscure (very few people outside of naval historians have heard of the HMS Temeraire.)
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403px-Tongues_of_Serpents_Cover

When I first discovered Naomi Novik’s alternate history, Napoleonic era with dragons, Dragonriders of Pern meets Hornblower series of books, I read them voraciously. The first three were out and available, and if I recall correctly, I read them in the space of about a week while doing all sorts of other things (like school and work). Book four again caught me by surprise – I didn’t note it until it was out in paperback – and then along came Victory of Eagles, the fifth and, to my mind, best since the first book in the series. For a number of reasons, I took some time away from the books, but recently I have decided to give it another crack, as there are now three books out that I have yet to read. Well, two now, as I’ve finished Tongues of Serpents. I can only hope that the two books I have still sitting on my shelf prove to be more exciting than the one I’ve just finished.
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